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2014 - Humanity First: Gift of Sight, Antigua Guatemala
2013
- Humanity First: Gift of Sight, Antigua Guatemala
2012
- Humanity First USA
2012
- Hajirah Saeed, MD | Charles Bouchard, MD
2012
- Shuchi Patel, MD | Eileen Gable OD | Samir Vira, MD
2010
- Eileen Gable, OD | David Yoo, MD | Nikki Saraiya, MD |
2010
- Robert J. Barnes, MD | Peter Russo, OD | R. Tracy Williams, OD | Omar Krad, MD
2010
- Charles Bouchard, MD | Linda Novak, MD | John Clements, MD |
2009
- Eileen Gable, OD | Peter Russo, OD | R. Tracy Williams, OD
2008
- Charles Bouchard, MD
2007
- Johann Ohly, MD | Joseph Doe, MD | Emily Velotta, MD |
2006 - Brent Hayek, MD | Matthew Kim, MD
2003 - Geoffrey Emerick, MD | Tracy Williams, OD
2001 - Tracy Williams, OD



On October 25, 2014, Humanity First USA's Gift of Sight team arrived in Guatemala City for the fifth annual week-long eye camp. The camp provides free eye care to rural Guatemalans funded by donations made through Humanity First and hospital donated equipment. Ophthalmic pharmaceutical companies have also contributed in order to keep the surgeries free for the patients.

In the past few years, the Gift of Sight team has set up camps over multiple cities in Guatemala to provide service to as many locals as possible. In congruence with performing the surgeries, the doctors' part of the Gift of Sight team will be teaching the local doctors and nurses new surgical techniques. Triage clinics have been taking place since early October with the support of Humanity First Guatemala, and thus far there are fifty cataract surgeries and fifty pterygium surgeries scheduled for the upcoming trip.

This year's Gift of Sight mission has been organized and carried out under the guidance of Gift of Sight Program Director and ophthalmologist, Dr. Ahsan Khan and Assistant Director, Aysha Alburaki. Lead ophthalmologists for the 2014 camp are Dr. Khan and Dr. Bouchard, who is the Chairman of the Department of Ophthalmology at the Loyola University Medical Center in Maywood, Illinois. They will be joined by ophthalmologists Dr. Karen Small, Dr. Asad Movahedan, Dr. Majid Rouhbakhsh, and Dr. Amir Mehralian, Juan Nuñez, scrub technician, Dr. Syed Saqib Ali, anesthesiologist, and will be supported by technicians, residents, medical students, and photojournalists.

We cannot do this without your support: please consider making a contribution— with a $100 donation, you can cover costs for one cataract surgery and help give the gift of sight.

Please visit our Gift of Sight blog

Guatemala - 2014 - Humanity First USA's Gift of Sight team
Description

2014 Gift of Sight trip to Antigua Guatemala for eye surgeries and education.

Location Antigua Guatemala [ MAP ]
Video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aVioHWmBbuA
Web http://usa.humanityfirst.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=268



Restoring Communities and Building a Future are the guiding principles for Humanity First USA. Humanity First works to assist people afflicted by natural disasters, war, and poverty by first providing the needed disaster relief services and then by building capacity of these communities. Our aim is to restore dignity by providing the resources to help people get back on their feet quickly.

Guatemala - 2013 - Humanity First USA: Gift of Sight
Description

2013 Gift of Sight trip to Antigua Guatemala for eye surgeries and education.

Location Antigua Guatemala [ MAP ]
Video http://animoto.com/play/mal5SvfzEpRNqE1OOgLFzA#
Web  http://www.firstgiving.com/fundraiser/ahmed-ahad/giftofsight2013
 
Guatemala - 2012 - Humanity First USA: Gift of Sight
Description

Humanity First USA's Gift of Sight team returned to Salud y Paz in Chichicastenango, Guatemala for their third annual eye clinic. Over 250 free medications were dispensed and 45 surgeries were performed by a team of 8 doctors from the US, Guatemala, Nicaragua and El Salvador.

Location Chichicastenango, Guatemala [ MAP ]
Video
  DONATE: http://goo.gl/ArUaC
Tumblr: http://hfgiftofsight.tumblr.com
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/HFGiftofSight
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/HumanityFirstUSA
Official HF USA Website: http://usa.humanityfirst.org
 
Guatemala - 2012 - October
Physicians Hajirah Saeed and Charles Bouchard, MD
Location Guatemala [ MAP ]
  Trip Photo Presentation
Between October 15th and 18th Dr. Bouchard and I from Loyola, and Drs. Djalilian and Mehralian from UIC went to Guatemala to perform cataract and pterygium surgeries. The group was led by Dr. Ahsan Khan through the non-profit organization Humanity First. This was the first time that Loyola has participated in a collaborative mission trip involving ophthalmologists from several institutions. We also worked with Guatemalan ophthalmologist Dr. Rudy Gutierrez and his team of residents and fellows. With collaborative efforts like these, we are able to provide a wide range of services, and learn and observe the surgical techniques of others.

Prior to our arrival, the Guatemalan team of ophthalmologists screened and triaged patients so that when surgery week arrived, we were most efficient in delivering surgical care. While operating rooms were running, other patients who desired ophthalmologic consultation were seen and triaged as well. Perhaps most importantly, with this collaboration, and with ophthalmologists on the ground in Guatemala, we were able to ensure follow-up care for our patients and develop a foundation to continue work that truly allows a level of access to care for these patients. Furthermore, these trips are incredible educational resources. The pathology that is seen is vastly different from what is typically encountered for us in Chicago. Several factors play into this including geography, climate, and access to care. We can't change the first two, but we can work to increase patients' quality of life by allowing them access to care they may not have otherwise been able to procure.

Collaboration with Guatemalan ophthalmologists also greatly aided in breaking the language barriers so that optimal care could be provided for our patients. Despite limited Spanish-speaking capabilities from out Chicago team, there are some gestures that transcend language. It was apparent that pre-operative excitement and renewed hope for better sight was translated into post-operative grins of satisfaction and fulfillment of that hope.

For me personally, I hope to keep my actions rooted in the values of social equity while at the same time seek excellence in medical knowledge and its translation into patient care. Trips like these allow me to continue down this path and satisfy my intellectual curiosity while stimulating it, engage my manual dexterity while deftly honing it, and furnish me with deep personal satisfaction while renewing my sincere dedication.

Here's to continuing to reinforce the humanity and dignity of patient, practitioner, and profession for years to come.

Hajirah Saeed, MD

 
Guatemala - 2012 - February
Physicians Shuchi Patel, MD, Eileen Gable OD, Samir Vira, MD
Location Guatemala [ MAP ]
  Trip Photo Presentation
It was an honor to be able to represent Loyola on our last mission trip to Guatemala in February 2012. Our group consisted of Dr. Eileen Gable OD, Dr. Samir Vira a senior resident, Dr. Rominder Momi MD from Kresge, Dr. Jigna Joshi MD a local glaucoma specialist. For the first time, we collaborated with optometrists from Illinois College of Optometry (ICO). It was a joint effort to provide care to those less privileged residing in Chiquimula, which is in the south east part of Guatemala. Loyola has participated in other mission trips to Guatemala, usually to Chichicastenago, but this was the first in this area and working with outside ophthalmologists, optometrists, students.

I did not know what to expect when I agreed to participate. I was a little tentative about safety as well as being able to provide care to patients there under unknown conditions. I have nothing but the best to say about the experience from the personal gratification, the cultural experience, building ties with other professionals to the opportunity to help others and learning to provide clinical and surgical care with limited supplies and equipment.

Once in Guatemala our trip began with a drive to Antigua to pick up an operating microscope to bring with us to Chiquimula. Antigua is beautiful and picturesque with colorful houses, small paved roads and friendly people. Nearby is a volcano which we climbed and got to enjoy the breathtaking view. We then took our 150 pound microscope and drove the 6 hours to Chiquimula. On the way we had an opportunity to visit a local orphanage and provide some rudimentary screenings while there. The children were so friendly and loved playing with all of us.

Once in Chiquimula we met with a local ophthalmologist, Dr. Luis Molina. We were lucky to have his hospitality and guidance. He allowed us to use his operating room (OR) and served as an interpreter for us as well when we needed to communicate things more complicated than the few phrases we were comfortable with. We set up our equiptment and waited for the clinics to begin.

The first day there were over 200 patients! Luckily for us, there were 12 optometrists, students and volunteers to help screen the patients. Dr. Gable helped to keep everything organized, and therefore we were able to maximize our operative time and begin surgery immediately.

We learned quickly to make do with the supplies we had. We had brought with us medications, gloves and other surgical basics. Gloves had to be reused when appropriate, and without a scrub nurse in the operating room, we also learned to autoclave the equipment ourself. We usually had 2 patients in the OR at all times either getting a cataract surgery or removal of a pterygium. But is was fun, comfortable and a learning experience. Our days were long, starting at 8 am, and ending around 7 pm. When we did step out of the OR and saw the mass of people in the heat we became very grateful for the AC in the OR and really appreciated all the effort that the optometrists did to screen patients and provide glasses all while standing in the scorching sun.

We operated and saw patients for 5 days, and did a dozen cataract surgeries and over 90 pterygium removals. The gratitude of the patients was evident from not only the small trinkets we received as parting gifts, but the heartfelt embraces.

Overall, we learned a lot about the culture, and were able to touch the lives of some patients and most definitely had our lives touched by them. For a first time in a new setting and a new set-up we had many successes. Our relationship with Dr. Molina as well as ICO will hopefully grow and strengthen so we can continue to work together to improve the mission and provide better care.

Shuchi Patel, MD

 
Guatemala - 2010 - September
Physicians Robert J. Barnes, MD, Peter Russo, OD, R. Tracy Williams, OD, Omar Krad, MD
Location Guatemala [ MAP ]
  Trip Photo Presentation
 
Guatemala - 2010 - May
Physicians Eileen Gable, OD, David Yoo, MD, Nikki Saraiya, MD
Location Guatemala [ MAP ]
  Trip Photo Presentation
 
Guatemala - 2010 - January
Physicians Charles Bouchard, MD, Linda Novak, MD, John Clements, MD
Location Guatemala [ MAP ]
  Trip Photo Presentation (40Mb PDF)
Trip PowerPoint Presentation (41Mb PPT)
 
On Jan 15-23rd, 2010, I participated in the Loyola department of Ophthalmology's mission to Guatemala. This trip was the culmination of 2 and a half years of hoping. For me the decision to go to Loyola’s residency program was largely based on their commitment to foreign missions, so not going on this trip would have been a major disappointment. The team was made up of myself, Dr. Charles Bouchard, Cecelia Diaz, and Yvonne Diamoni. We each had a unique role to play and the trip would not have happened without our unique talents and abilities.

Our mission was 3 fold: establish that we could do eye surgeries at Chichicastenango's Hospital El Buen Samaritano, partner with a local doctor to create a sustainable eye care service at the same hospital and join with Guatemalan national residents to aid in their education.

Surgery in Chichi was a different experience all together compared with eye surgery in the United States. First, the cataracts were much more dense. It was very common to see a person who was legally blind in both eyes from only cataract. Second, the operating set up was different from the Luxurious Ambulatory Surgery Center we have here at Loyola. We found ourselves operating with scopes that weren’t exactly up to our specifications, improvising uses for surgical instruments and making do without the latest surgical technology. It really hones your skill as a surgeon. Personally, I was able to do Pterygium surgeries independently during the trip. As a resident you take for granted the weight of the responsibility you feel when you operate by yourself for the first time. It was a great experience for me to feel that weight, rise to the occasion and perform. We were also able to observe Gonzalo Cruz’s technique of Small Incision Sutureless Extracapsular cataract extraction. This technique is invaluable to learn for the purposes of high volume cataract surgery in the under-resourced world. Overall, the surgical experience was good and we demonstrated that successful surgeries could be done at the hospital in Chichi.

Establishing a long term, sustainable eye care program in Chichicastenango was of paramount importance to this trip. Taking several short term trips to this area every year would not greatly affect the overall eye care here, but if we could partner with a local doctor and supply the resources, perhaps something could be done. In this spirit, we worked with Dr. Louisa Rosal, a recent graduate of a Guatemalan Residency program. We greatly enjoyed getting to know her and her husband Roberto. After our stay there, they both were very committed to the project and will be returning to the hospital on a regular basis to run clinics and perform eye surgeries. This type of effort is critical in affecting the regional ocular health in countries like Guatemala. This is a country that has several national residency programs, graduating 10 or more new ophthalmologists every year. There are doctors in this country and yet there are areas of disparity. They do not need western doctors to come in and take care of their poor, they need us to help partner with them, to enable them to take care of their own people where resources may not be available.

In the same spirit of cooperation, we spoke at a national meeting of Guatemalan ophthalmologists and residents, delivering scientific talks on cataract, corneal transplant and pterygium surgeries. In so doing, we hoped to establish a mutual line communication and common learning. Both sides of this equation have much to offer the other. They are well trained and certainly are not lacking in surgical skill. It would be a mistake to think that we were the superior group just because we were from the United States. Our meeting once again highlighted the fact that Guatemala has some really outstanding Ophthalmologists. In order to make a larger difference in the problem of cataract blindness in their country we need to partner with them by providing resources to under reached areas.

John Clements, PGY-4

 
Guatemala - 2009
Physicians Peter Russo, OD and R. Tracy Williams, OD
Location Guatemala [ MAP ]
  Trip Photo Presentation
 
A team of 3 optometrists, 4 audiologists and one dentist along with support personnel for a total of 22 people traveled to Chichicastenango, Guatemala for a clinic held February 3-6, 2009. The mission was sponsored by a grant from Rotary International. R. Tracy Williams, OD and Peter A. Russo, OD, both on faculty in the Department of Ophthalmology, were two of the optometrists; the rest of the group were from Wheaton, Illinois, Indiana and Ohio. Chichicastenango is a somewhat remote mountain town of about 40,000 people in central Guatemala. It is famous for one of the largest outdoor markets in North America held on Sunday and Thursday of each week. We brought with us suitcases filled with prescription glasses, sun wear, over the counter eye drops and prescription eye drops as well all the equipment necessary to perform basic eye examinations for glasses and to screen for ocular health problems. Working out of Good Samaritan Hospital in the town, we served over 500 patients of all age groups in 4 days. The audiologists served 300 and the dentist cared for an additional 100, most of whom were children. In addition to providing eye care, a goal of this trip was to lay the groundwork to establish a permanent rotation for ophthalmology residents from Loyola to go down 3-4 times a year to provide surgical care. We worked to establish relationships with local personnel including a missionary minister from the US, the hospital administrator and local ophthalmologists who would support a program of this nature and assist with follow up care. We also established local contacts for housing and met with local Rotary officials in support of future missions.
 
Guatemala - 2008
Physician Charles Bouchard, MD, Robert J. Barnes, MD, R. Tracy Williams, OD,
Location Guatemala [ MAP ]
  Trip Photo Presentation
 
 
Guatemala - 2007
Resident Johann Ohly, MD
Location Flores, Guatemala [ MAP ]
Hospitals Hospital Shalom
Clinic of Eyes and Ears
San Benito Dispensario Clinic
  Trip Photo Presentation
 
Johann Ohly, MD, was the third resident to participate in the newly established resident rotation in Guatemala. Johann spent several weeks in Flores performing surgeries, running clinics and teaching the Guatemalan residents. His mission trip synopsis is as follows...

Hello all, Guatemala Synopsis, February 2007

My first real impression of Guatemala was the car ride from the airport in Flores to the residence in San Benito. Apparently the only traffic law in Guatemala appears to be that one has to break all laws at all times. To make the driving even more perilous, pigs, dogs, cows, chicken, horses, mules and goats were all over the place, sometimes wallowing suicidally in the middle of the street. Some roads were under construction, evidence of the upcoming election. Huge machines dug deep trenches in the dirt roads, followed by men sorting the rocks that turned up and by some criteria discarding large ones at the roadside. A steam roller would compact the road only to have the huge machines repeat their havoc and the flock of workmen continue their onerous task. This process continued for the two weeks I spent in San Benito along the same two mile stretch of road without signs of imminent paving. When we lost internet service in the first week, it took three days to restore service not from technical difficulty, rather motivational inertia. The driver hired to bring patients from an outlying village told us at 6:30am that he was on his way and never showed up. Lunch hour spanned from about 11:30am to 2:30pm, the longest hour of my life.

I include these vignettes to illustrate the differences in nearly all elements of daily life and interpersonal expectations. As an American one is used to working 60+ hours per week, especially during residency. One takes for granted excellent service when it is contracted for. But the values of hard work and reliability appear to have less priority in rural Guatemala. People that can be relied on to keep their word are difficult to find and worth their weight in gold. Fortunately Linda Novak has found many of these people to make things happen in the Peten area. The mission benefited greatly from these connections, but we still had difficulties.

My first week started with a two day jornada in Dolores, a village about 85 kilometers from San Benito. We were hosted by the Dominican malnutrition hospital which, as you can imagine, has very ample and good food. We saw about 40-45 patients over two days and gave out many glasses, sunglasses, artificial tears and glaucoma drops. Six patients were surgical candidates and transportation was arranged to bring them to the Hospital Shalom in San Benito for surgery on Wednesday. When we called the driver on Wednesday morning he told us he was on his way. Then we heard from the staff at the malnutrition hospital that nobody had come to get the two patients that came for surgery. So they were put on a bus and arrived at 10:30am for 8:00am surgery. We did their pterygium surgery and arranged for them to take a bus back to Dolores.

Out of the six people scheduled for surgery only two came. This is a testament to several factors that impede access to care in rural Guatemala; money, transportation and fear. We had taken care of the first two issues by charging minimal fee for surgery and providing transportation, however eye surgery is not routine as it is in the US. The surgical techniques are not as refined, and as a result more bad outcomes occur. Patients hear about situations where a friend or relative was blinded by surgical complication and as a result avoid surgery. The Peten program is like a new practice opening its doors in many ways. Locals are still finding out about us by word of mouth and the jornadas. If people continue to have good experiences with Loyola doctors and know that they will be able to rely on them arriving during a certain part of the year, more will trust and more will come. Good surgical results will help allay some of the fear of eye surgery.

On Thursday we operated on patients from Santa Rita who were screened for surgery the week before I arrived. Four out of eight people scheduled were brought for surgery. One man had come all the way from Mexico to have an extremely dense cataract removed. After the two pterygium surgeries were completed, we called for this man and were told that he had left. Apparently he had second thoughts and headed back to Mexico, still blinded by his cataract. We did an extracapsular cataract surgery on the last patient and called it a day.

The surgeries are done at Hospital Shalom that has converted its ER to an OR while the true OR facilities are being completed. The facility was very good for surgery and well stocked. Many of the donated surgical supplies I brought were superfluous as they have been accumulating over time with few surgeries done at Hospital Shalom. Once a larger volume of surgeries is done, I am sure that we will need to replenish them. Having each resident that does the Guatemala trip put together a list of needed items while in Guatemala will help guide future residents to bring the necessary items. Another consideration for future trips will be to make the surgical setup mobile, to be able to take the OR to the jornada thus eliminating unreliable patient transportation as a limiting factor. This is by no means as easy as it would seem and will require logistical planning and possibly capital investment in reliable transportation.

After providing eye care at Hospital Shalom’s wheelchair jornada on Saturday, the medical students and I spent Sunday and Monday at the Mayan ruins in Tikal. It is really awe-inspiring to see what the Mayans were able to accomplish with the limited (by our standards) scientific and technological resources.

Week two was spent seeing patients at the Dominican Dispensario eye clinic in San Benito, following up on post-ops and seeing patients in a local nursing home that was recently opened. During our follow-up on post-ops in Santa Rita, I cemented my Spanish skills by helping a wife pick out a pair of sunglasses for her husband. I must say that even though rural Guatemalans may not have many material possessions, their appearance is very important. If someone tells a very nearsighted person who is blind without glasses that their glasses don’t look good, they will not wear the glasses.

On Thursday and Friday of the second week Linda Novak and I attended a conference in Guatemala City hosted by Rudy Gutierrez. The topics were mainly refractive and phacoemulsification cataract surgery, an interesting choice since most surgeons who attended don’t do refractive surgery and are still doing extracapsular cataract surgery. Nonetheless, I did get a chance to meet some of the ophthalmology residents and practice my Spanish comprehension. Linda Novak knew and approached many of the ophthalmologists who attended the meeting regarding epidemiological research. The idea would be to collect ICD-9 diagnostic information from ophthalmologists via an interactive online website.

Unfortunately the conference prevented me from giving lectures and teaching. I think that there is a significant need to work with our ophthalmology resident colleagues in Guatemala. From discussions with them, I discovered that much of their clinical and surgical training is on their self-guided and by no means as standardized across residency programs as in the US. On future trips, inviting the residents to join us in eye jornadas in Chichicastenango and Coban would provide an opportunity not only to give lectures but also to exchange surgical techniques. We don’t have much experience with many of the procedures that they are comfortable doing, like pterygium and extracapsular surgery. We may be able help the Guatemalans learn other techniques like phaco and glaucoma surgery. The potential partnership extends beyond our travel to Guatemala. Many residents may be interested in coming to the US to learn, to make connections for possible clinical fellowships in the US, and to have a good time.

I was invited to spend my last weekend in Antigua at Rudy Gutierrez’s house. I didn’t see much of Rudy, but Antigua was a wonderful end to my travels with a symphony concert in the main square on Saturday night (complete with military band, marimbas, and the 1812 Overture) and a Lent pilgrimage on Sunday morning.

Guatemala is a beautiful country with spectacular variation in geography and a great need for eye care in the rural areas. I think Guatemala is very important in the future of Central American ophthalmology as many of the future doctors are currently training in Guatemala. We can have a positive impact on the quality of their training and raise expectations for quality of care in Guatemala by working with the ophthalmology residents in the formative time of their careers.

 
Guatemala - 2007
Resident Joseph Doe, MD
Location Flores, Guatemala [ MAP ]
Hospitals Hospital Shalom
Clinic of Eyes and Ears
Dominican Despensarlo Clinic
  Trip Photo Presentation
 
Joseph Doe, MD, spent several weeks in Guatemala performing surgeries, running clinics and teaching the Guatemalan residents. Joe was the fourth resident to participate in the second year program.

Joseph Doe, MD, spent several weeks in Guatemala performing surgeries, running clinics and teaching the Guatemalan residents. Joe was the fourth resident to participate in the second year program.

 
Guatemala - 2007
Resident Emily Velotta, MD
Location Flores, Guatemala [ MAP ]
Hospitals Hospital Shalom
Clinic of Eyes and Ears
Dominican Despensarlo Clinic
  Trip Photo Presentation
 
Emily Velotta, MD, was the first female to participate in the Guatemala resident rotation program. Emily provided eye care, performed many surgeries, treated a variety of eye diseases, made surgical referrals, and dispensed more than 200 pairs of glasses in April 2007.
 
Guatemala - 2006
Resident Brent Hayek, MD
Location Flores, Guatemala [ MAP ]
Hospitals Clinic of Eyes and Ears
Dominican Despensarlo Clinic
Roosevelt Hospital
Centro Cirugia Ocular
Hermano Pedro Hospital
  Trip PowerPoint Presentation
 
Brent Hayek, MD, was the first resident to participate in the new resident rotation in Guatemala. He spent several weeks there building a clinic from the ground up as well as providing eye care to the natives.
 
Guatemala - 2006
Resident Matthew Kim, MD
Location Flores, Guatemala [ MAP ]
Hospitals Clinic of Eyes and Ears
Dominican Despensarlo Clinic
Roosevelt Hospital
Centro Cirugia Ocular
Hermano Pedro Hospital
  Trip PowerPoint Presentation
 
Matthew Kim, MD, was the second resident to participate in the newly established resident rotation in Guatemala. Matt spent several weeks in Guatemala performing surgeries, running clinics and teaching the Guatemalan residents.
 
Guatemala - 2003
Faculty Geoffrey Emerick, MD
Location Nuevo Progresso, Guatemala
Hospitals Hospital de la Familia
  Trip Photo Presentation
 
Geoffrey Emerick, MD, assistant professor and director of the glaucoma service, joined a team of ophthalmologists and support staff at the Hospital de la Familia in Nuevo Progreso, Guatemala. There they treated more than 500 patients and performed approximately 200 cataract, glaucoma and pterygium surgeries in seven days.
 
Guatemala - 2003
Faculty Tracy Williams, OD
Location Coban, Guatemala [ MAP ]
Hospitals Hospital de la Familia
  Trip Photo Presentation
 
R. Tracy Williams, OD, and Geoffrey Emerick, MD, traveled to Guatemala as members of two separate teams. In a joint effort between the Rotary Club, the Lions Club and several church organizations, Dr. Williams, clinical assistant professor and director of the low vision and visual rehabilitation service, worked in a clinic near Coban, Guatemala. During their four-day visit, the team of ophthalmologists, optometrists and audiologists examined over 1,000 people, treating a variety of eye diseases, making surgical referrals, and dispensing more than 1,000 pairs of glasses and 500 hearing aids.
 
Guatemala - 2001
Faculty Tracy Williams, OD
Location Chichicastenango, Guatemala [ MAP ]